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Decibrity Playlist: Iron Reagan

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Reagan1c

Sure, it’s been a year since Iron Reagan dropped its debut full-length. Despite the various other commitments of its members, the band recently began a run of tour dates that will take them through April, all while wrapping up work on their sophomore LP (which, by the way, will be for Relapse). Given how much we liked Worse Than Dead (it made our top 40 of 2013) and how stoked we are about that last sentence, we asked frontman Tony Foresta about some records he digs. His picks are as eclectic as they are entertaining.

Pick up a copy of Worse Than Dead here and check out IR’s tour dates below.

Quicksand–Slip (1993)
One of my top five favorite albums. Whenever I have to do a long shift and don’t want to fuck with my iPod, I just let this one roll. It’s funny, I used to do the same thing with this record mowing my parents lawn in high school. Only instead of an iPod, I had a Walkman cassette player and my Slip cassette. I remember having to stop the lawnmower to flip my tape mid-mow (laughs)!

Pusrad–31 Premature Ejaculations Tape December 2012 (2012)
Kevin Sharp got me into these guys. Super fast blasts of short and fun hardcore. I mean really, really fast. Not something you want to listen to while in a stressful situation like driving in New Jersey or something, it might just make your brain explode. Regardless, this always puts me in a good mood when I listen to it.

Black Flag–Who’s Got The 10½? (1986)
This is in a three-way tie with Decendents’ Hallraker and Iron Maiden’s Live After Death as my all-time favorite live record. This one goes on the list because it was cranked in the van a shitload during the recent Iron Reagan/Power Trip/Mammoth Grinder tour and on this album they play a ton of stuff off Loose Nut, which is my top Flag record at the moment. My fav Flag records change from time to time.

Longmont Potion Castle–Best of Longmont Potion Castle: Volume 1 (1996)
I’ve established so many long term relationships with people just by one of us muttering one of the million hilarious quotes from these prank calls. Just one weird comment usually follows with “Wait, you listen to Longmont?!?” and then we are friends forever. It’s really happened. You are either the type of person that really loves this stuff or you hate it. If you hate it then I probably don’t want to hang out with you.

Tegan and Sara’s “Closer” (from 2013′s Heartthrob)
Everybody was jocking that Robin Thicke “Blurred Lines” shit as the dance jam of the summer last year–although that’s a hell of a catchy song, the lyrics are a little to “date rapey” for my tastes–all the while this Tegan and Sara song was killing it then and is still chugging away at parties now while theres a foot of snow outside.

Sockeye–Barf On A Globe (1999)
The best/worst band on the planet. I go through phases where I wont listen to them for a couple years and then “Buttfuck Your Own Face” will pop in my head and then I’m screwed for at least three months.

Mercyful Fate–Melissa (1983)
Album rules. But you dummies already know this.

Spazz/Romantic Gorrilla–Split 12″ (1996)
This record was my first introduction to power violence back in the day. Spazz from then on have been one of my favorite bands of all time. But unfortunately for them the standout track on this release would have to be on Japan’s Romantic Gorilla’s side. The song “I’m On Diet” has just as much anger and angst as any Youth of Today track out there, and who can blame these ladies really? Diets fucking suck.

Out Cold–Two Broken Hearts Are Better Than One (2000)
Out Cold is one of the most underrated hardcore bands of all time in my opinion. They were cranking out killer release after release for what seemed like forever on a yearly basis before the singer/guitar player’s untimely demise. My favorite track on this record is “Skinned Alive”, not because it’s the best song they wrote, but because it’s the slowest jam on the record and sticks out as a heavy track in some weird way.

Dystopia–Human = Garbage (1994)
This record changed my life and really gave me a different view of the world both socially and musically. I’ve been going back to this one a lot lately and it still has parts on it that give me chills.

Asylum–Demo (2013)
Awesome new d-beat band from Richmond. They’re great live too. It’s still mind blowing how much killer music comes out of this town on a yearly basis. Looking forward to more stuff to come out from them soon.

*Pick up a copy of Worse Than Dead here.

**Iron Reagan tour dates:

3/29/2014 Philadelphia PA @The Underground Arts

Iron Reagan and Occultist
4/2/2014 Richmond VA @Strange Matter
4/4/2014 Harrisonburg, VA @ MACROCK
4/5/2014 Nashville, TN @ TBA
4/6/2014 Little Rock, AK @ Vino’s

Weapons of Thrash Destruction Tour
Ghoul, Iron Reagan, Occultist
4/9/2014 Tempe, AZ @ Club Red
4/10/2014 San Diego, CA @ Soda Bar
4/11/2014 Santa Ana, CA @ Constellation Room
4/12/2014 Camarillo, CA @ Rock City Studios
4/13/2014 Los Angeles, CA @ The Roxy
4/14/2014 Sacramento, CA @ Midtown Barfly
4/15/2014 Portland, OR @ Branx
4/18/2014 Oakland, CA @ BRAINSQUEEZE

Iron Reagan and Occultist
4/22/2014 Salt Lake City TBA
4/23/2014 Denver CO @ Moe’s
4/24/2014 Lawrence KS @ TBA
4/25/2014 St. Louis MO @ Fubar
4/26/2014 Munster In @Three Floyd’s Brewery
4/27/2014 Chicago IL @ Cobra Lounge
4/28/2014 Toledo @ Frankie’s
4/29/2014 Columbus @ Ace Of Cups
4/30/2014 Pittsburgh @ Smiling Moose

***Past Decibrity entries include:

Fight Amp
Cynic
Melt-Banana
Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Fight Amp

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, March 20th, 2014

jvdfightampbootsaddle1

Last we’d heard from Fight Amp, the trio was just off a red-eye after spending 30 days last fall playing 30 shows across Europe with Black Tusk. Now that the South Jersey natives are set to hit the road yet again–a brief jaunt of seven shows in seven days–guitarist/vocalist Mike McGinnis passed along five current band’s that influence him (consider it a close cousin to bassist/vocalist Jon DeHart’s hangover playlist from 2012). But before we get to his picks, we’ll let him get you primed for his group’s upcoming tour (dates below): “We’re super stoked to be doing this limited run of Northeastern US shows with our southern brothers in Whores. These are our first shows in the states outside of Philadelphia since our run with Today Is The Day, KEN Mode and Black Tusk last year. We’re a few months off a European tour with Black Tusk and can’t wait to hit some of our usual haunts again. We’re rolling out some of our new material and feeling real good about doing this quick round of killer shows. Also, Whores are on a roll right now and are not to be missed. Second fucking wave.”

If you haven’t already, pick up a copy of Fight Amp’s last record, Birth Control, here.

Pissed Jeans
You know, we’ve been from the same city for some time and we hardly cross paths with these dudes. That being said, they influence the hell out of my guitar playing and lyric sheets. One of the best live bands around and their last few full lengths get pretty regular play on my home stereo. Hot Snakes/Pissed Jeans in Philly was probably my top show in 2012.

Whores
Our noise rock brothers from Atlanta. Can’t say enough good things about this band’s sound and songwriting. It’s simple yet super well-written. Thinking of these guys often makes me rethink some of my own riffs and remind myself that sometimes less is more. All killer, no filler, live precision.

Ecstatic Vision
New band, but extremely high on the list of bands that influence me right now, even including non-contemporaries. I work with their guitar player Doug Sabolick and seeing how hard this dude works on his art form drives me to work even harder at mine. It doesn’t hurt that this band is as dialed-in as it gets and isn’t afraid to test the waters outside of metal. These dudes are on the brink and will be talked about a whole lot in the next year.

Creepoid
I could interchange Creepoid and Ecstatic Vision between two and three easily. Another band I work closely with and have had ties with for years. Their current round of success is well deserved, and they influence the hell out of me to keep working and writing new material. These guys are writing potential hit after hit, just put out a record on No Idea that is front to back awesome with no filler, and as a “shoegaze” band, they aren’t afraid to reach into their heavier punk influenced side. Best band in Philadelphia at the moment.

Melvins
I don’t think I really need to say much about this one. Been my number one for years, influences my guitar playing immensely, and the fact that I can put this on a list of contemporaries after all these years is pretty damn amazing. Bullhead live in its entirety was one of the best shows I’ve ever seen in my life. Their “sometimes people like us, sometimes they don’t, we just do what we do” attitude continues to influence my own attitude when it comes to Fight Amp.

*Photo by Jonathan Van Dine

**Tour dates (all with Whores):

March 26th – Syracuse, NY @ Badlands w/ Blood Sun Circle
March 27th – Allston, MA @ O’Brien’s Pub w/ No Way, Livver
March 28th – Brooklyn, NY @ St Vitus Bar w/ No Way, Creepoid
March 29th – Philadelphia, PA @ Kung Fu Necktie w/ Rye Coalition
March 30th – Baltimore, MD @ Ottobar w/ Multicult, Passage Between
March 31st – Chesepeake, VA @ Roger’s
April 1st – Richmond, VA @ Strange Matter w/ Hellbear, Prisoner

***Past entries include:

Cynic
Melt-Banana
Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Cynic

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

cynic

Just a quick listen to Cynic would reveal that Paul Masvidal and company probably have pretty eclectic musical tastes. Given that the band dropped its third full-length, Kindly Bent To Free Us, last month, the guitarist/vocalist was kind enough to pass along a medley of recent (and fairly nostalgic) listens. As he explains, “Playlists have been updated on average a weekly to biweekly basis depending on how much listening I’m doing. The list below is in no particular hierarchy or intentional order other than [picks] two and three due to their relationship.” We’d also be remiss if we neglected to point out that the man also has a soft spot for Meshuggah.

Pick up a copy of the Decibel HOFers’ latest album here.

Johann Sebastian Bach–Fugue In B Minor BWV 951 (played by Glen Gould)
The Bach fugues have been on constant rotation in my house for about 10 days now. Each and every fugue is a masterpiece of composition. Bach cleans out and essentially resets my ears. I feel better listening to these works in ways I can’t describe, they’re just good for my health and my brain in particular. Of course Glen Gould is considerably one of the greatest interpreters of Bach on piano, which lifts the whole experience even further into cosmic transcendent beauty.

John Lennon–John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band (1970)
John gives us his heart on this record. Beginning with the opening track “Mother”, which grabs hold and doesn’t let you go…arrestingly alive. Check out “Working Class Hero”, the brutally honest “Love” and then there’s the epic “Well Well Well” where we’re gifted with the classic primal-scream-therapy ending that evokes tremendous psychic pain. This is living sonic art.

Tame Impala–Lonerism (2012)
In line with the Lennon kick and directly influenced by the Beatles, here comes Tame Impala with some modern nostalgic psychedelic yumminess. I love the free spirit TI shares with its music. They have a relaxed quality to their songs that makes them feel like friends you want to hang out with. Good vibes all around. Vibe to “Apocalypse Dreams”, “Nothing That Has Happened So Far Has Been Anything We Could Control” and “Music To Walk Home By”.

The Bulgarian State Television Female Vocal Choir’s “Kalimankou Denkou” [The Evening Gathering]” (from 1975′s Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares [The Mystery of Bulgarian Voices])
I’ve been a big fan of this choir since 1988′s Le Mystère des Voix Bulgares, volume II. The harmony is so unbelievably sophisticated and delivered from an ecstatic state. They morph into a singular complex voice whispering timeless truths into my ear; life is here to wake you up and to engage your heart. I am a spiritual being having a human experience. Blagodarya Le Mystere des Voix Bulgares, blagodarya.

Atoms For Peace’s “Before Your Very Eyes…” (from 2013′s Amok)
The grooves on this record are across the board so damn hip. Loaded with sweet subdivisions falling in all the right spots. I love the deceptive elasticity of this approach to arrangement. It feels like Thom Yorke’s dropped down into his body and surrendered to the rhythm and his vibrant rhythm section. Massive soaring melodic motifs over repetitious syncopated grooves simply transport me. Delicious postmodern electronic rock.

Steve Reich–Music For 18 Musicians (written 1974-1976)
Organic acoustic synthesis with no dominant voice. The construction and deconstruction of rhythmic patterns. Gives me that Frippy feeling and a touch of King Crimson’s prog sensibilities. It’s the sound of life pulsating through my veins; sonic acupuncture, meridians, vibrating and cycling through the nervous system, healing the body. Pushes me into heightened mental states as if in a meditation practice where we arrive at an equilibrium. One hasn’t necessarily arrived anywhere, but a level of surrender and acceptance is present as if you let go enough to allow this space to arise. I’m hypnotized and transported into a new energy field where new life forms appear. Gravity is an illusion. Woah, here we go!

Caetano Veloso and Gal Costa–Domingo (1967)
One of my all time favorite Brazilian jazz records. The songs are raw, pure, elegant and honest. Makes me want to get cozy, take a deep breath and touch intimacy with my lips and finger tips. “Coração Vagabundo”, the opening track, says it all. The melodies are magic. Let yourself get lost in these short little heart-fueled lullabies.

Bob Dylan–Blonde On Blonde (1966)
My favorite Dylan record. The sound of letting go and letting life in. I trust in the integrity of this moment. I trust in life as it is. Thanks Bob. Check out “Sad Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands”.

*Order Kindly Bent To Free Us here.

**Past entries include:

Melt-Banana
Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Melt-Banana

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, February 27th, 2014

Melt Banana pc Resource Graphics

Melt-Banana‘s last record Fetch earned a place in our top 10 of 2013. Since Kevin Stewart-Panko already asked the now duo of vocalist Yasuko “Yako” Onuki and guitarist Ichiro Agata nearly every question imaginable back in October (most importantly about their Geocities website), we weren’t left with much ground that hadn’t already been covered. Onuki and Agata’s tunes may not be as popular in Japan, which they call home, as they are here, but that didn’t stop Yako from telling us about five records by Japanese bands that she listened to when she was a kid. Having never heard of any of them, I have a lot of catching up to do. You can pick up a copy of Fetch here (the link is real, we promise).

RC Succession–Single Man (1976)
They were a very famous rock band in Japan. Their singer Kiyoshiro was a kind of idol to me. This album is their early work and one of my favorite albums.

The Stalin–Stop Jap (1982)
They must appear on my list! They were the first Japanese punk band that I ever listened to.

Jun Togawa–Tamahime-sama (1984)
She is still one of my favorite singers in the world. She was also in a band Guernica, and it was good too, but for this list I am going with her outstanding solo work Tamahime-sama.

Inu–Meshi Kuuna! (1981)
This is a band from Osaka. They didn’t put out many albums since [they] didn’t have a long career.

Uchoten–Peace (1986)
I didn’t know much about this band before buying this album, but I just liked the sound of it. Kind of techno?

*Order Fetch here.

**Past entries include:

Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Junius (Part 2)

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, February 20th, 2014

02-Junius-Alysse_Gafkjen2

Last week, Junius helped celebrate the upcoming release of its excellent new EP, Days of the Fallen Sun, by having half of the band–namely, frontman/guitarist Joseph E. Martinez and bassist Joel Munguia–tell us about eight records that they were listening to back when things started in 2004. Now that everyone has (hopefully) had a chance to get his or her grubby hands on the record, guitarist Mike Repasch-Nieves and drummer Dana Filloon are here to close the loop on the quartet’s trip down memory lane. You can pick up a copy of Days of the Fallen Sun here and be sure to check them out live in the near future if you can (dates below).

Mike Repasch-Nieves:

Hum–Downward Is Heavenward (1998) (favorite song: “Afternoon With The Axolotls”)
When the song “Stars” was on the radio, I thought this band was badass (even saw them on Conan O’Brien, which was so sick!), but somehow it wasn’t until this album that I really realized how amazing Hum was. They seemed like the nerdiest dudes and yet I still have not heard such heart-wrenchingly huge guitars done like this. The huge sound and overall melancholy on this album still gets me every time. I remember when I first met Joe (Martinez, Junius singer/guitarist), the two bands we geeked out about right off the bat were Hum and Failure, and both bands continue to influence us hugely. We almost recorded The Martyrdom of a Catastrophist with Matt Talbot [Hum guitarist/vocalist], and although it didn’t work out at the time, he is still one of my heroes who I hope to work with one day.

ISIS–Oceanic (2002) (favorite song: “Carry”)
Living in Boston in the late ’90s and early 2000s, I was fortunate enough to witness firsthand so many amazing bands as they came up in the local scene, and seeing ISIS as they developed was inspiring for sure. One of the best shows I can remember from back then was ISIS, 27, Pelican and Gregor Samsa at the Middle East in 2003. They definitely set the bar for me in a lot of ways. I remember the first time I heard this album…Will Benoit (of Constants, our first bassist, and longtime producer) was working at Hydra Head Records and had a burned CD-R and played it for me in his car. The first time just floored me, and years of listening to this album haven’t diminished its effect very much. Of course they took a sort of formula that bands like Neurosis and Godflesh established, but with this album I really felt like they came into their own and brought what I guess you would now call “post-metal” to a new level (although I hate the term “post”-ANYTHING at this point).

Cursive–The Ugly Organ (2003) (favorite song: “The Recluse”)
Between Domestica and The Ugly Organ, this band created two of the most emotionally powerful albums I’ve ever heard. Everything about this record lyrically spoke to me at the time, from relationships to the artistic and creative struggle…on top of the fact that the music is so amazing. I’ve always wished I could write an album like this, but there was some sort of convergence of emotion, energy, talent and perhaps desperation that brought this masterpiece out of them. It’s timeless to me.

The Mars Volta–De-Loused In The Comatorium (2003) (favorite song: “Drunkship of Lanterns”)
As a half Latino dude who spent a large part of my childhood growing up in Puerto Rico, Panama, and the Bronx, I was always inspired by Cedric and Omar, going back to the At The Drive-In days. Then when they came out with this, my mind was blown. Hearing these guys put a Latin spin on punk/classic prog was so cool to me and a strange conglomeration of so many disparate things that I loved but wouldn’t have had the idea or balls to put together. Omar’s guitar playing drove me and probably every other guitarist I knew at the time to spend more money on pedals and push the boundaries of what sounds we could make on our instruments.

Dana Filloon:

Sunny Day Real Estate–Diary (1994) (favorite track: “The Blankets Were The Stairs”)
This album changed my life. These songs opened my eyes and changed the way I viewed songwriting. William Goldsmith’s drums on this record have so much of their own melody.

Deftones–Deftones (2003) (favorite track: “Minerva”)
Abe Cunningham was and remains my favorite drummer. So much of my style is derived from Deftones records.

Hot Water Music–Caution (2002) (favorite track: “Trusty Chords”)
One of the main reasons I started playing drums was this band. This record is still in daily rotation and a huge part of my drumming style.

Poison the Well–Tear From The Red (2002) (favorite track: “Moments Over Exaggerate”)
This was is a kind of bridge record for me. In the elements in this record I can find all things I love about music. Beautiful. Aggressive.

*Photo by Alysse Gafkjen

*Order Days of the Fallen Sun here.

**Tour dates:

2/25 York, PA – The Depot #
2/26 Columbus, OH – Kobo #
2/27 Chicago, IL – Reggies Rock Club#
2/28 Erie, PA – Crooked I #
3/1 Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn Night Bazaar #*
3/2 Cambridge, MA – Middle East*

# with A Storm of Light
* with Caspian

***Past entries include:

Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Junius (Part 1)

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, February 13th, 2014

SONY DSC

A few weeks ago, we premiered a track from Junius’s excellent new EP, Days of the Fallen Sun. This year will not only see the release of new tunes from the quartet (in just a few days, no less), but it also marks a celebratory occasion that typically calls for diamond jewelry. Our budget here at the Deciblog isn’t quite that extravagant, so instead we thought we’d let the band take over our Thursday mornings for the next two weeks. For this morning’s installment, frontman/guitarist Joseph E. Martinez and bassist Joel Munguia compiled the following eight records that according to them share one thing in common according to them: “We thought since this year marks our tenth anniversary, we would take a look back at music we were all listening to when we started Junius in 2004.”

Once you’ve scoured the tunes below, be sure to pre-order a copy of the band’s new EP here.

Joseph E. Martinez:

The Cure–Disintegration (1989)
We were all listening to this album heavily while working on our first EP [2004's Forcing Out the Silence]. It was our atmospheric template for most of the early Junius songs. You can definitely hear it in “Hiding Knives”. The song “Disintegration” hits really hard for me.

Year Of The Rabbit–Year Of The Rabbit (2003)
I’m a massive Failure fan and I was really into ON (Ken Andrews’ solo project), so when I heard he teamed up with members of Shiner and National Skyline, I was stoked. I was able to see them twice, the second time they opened for Thursday and they opened with “Plainsong” by The Cure. It was perfect. My favorite track is “Hunted”.

Thomas Newman–Road To Perdition OST (2002)
The movie was fantastic, but the soundtrack blew me away. I would keep the DVD’s menu screen on all night so I could listen to the piano riff from the track “Road to Chicago”… that melody just hangs between two richly dark and beautiful places.

Placebo–Sleeping With Ghosts (2003)
In 2003/2004, if you saw me riding the T from Stony Brook stop to Downtown Crossing, there is a 93% chance I was listening to this album. Black Market Music was such a great album that I didn’t think they could come close, but I was wrong. All tracks are killer.

Joel Munguia:

Neurosis–A Sun That Never Sets (2001)
This album did and will always give me chills when listening. I had never heard “metal” like this before. The textures of it are unreal. Once you start the album, it feels wrong not to finish the entire thing. The accompanying DVD is a real treat too.

Helmet–Aftertaste (1997)
This was the first Helmet album I ever heard and I loved it right from the start. Heavy punk verses with huge washy Deftones-esque choruses. I’m sold. I can accurately air drum to this entire album. Definitely influenced how I play.

Failure–Fantastic Planet (1996)
This is an influential album for all of us in Junius. An unconventional experimental pop/prog album with 17 tracks? Badass. I admire Ken Andrews as a songwriter, lyricist, and musician. And Greg and Kellii are smart and innovative players as well.

Pelican–Australasia (2003)
The way these four dudes play off each other is truly something special. The mountains that they build on this album are awe-inspiring. Some of the most badass riffage ever documented. Now after playing shows together a few times I can say they are some genuine dudes as well.

Decibrity Playlist: Indian

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, January 30th, 2014

IndianPressPhotosEdouardPierrePhoto-4comp

After dropping the best album of its career earlier this month with From All Purity, the dudes in Indian are in the midst of (hopefully) enjoying some time off before hitting the road at the end of March. Given that guitarist/vocalist Will Lindsay is also probably not all that enthused about stepping out into the frigid Chicago winter all that often (if you’ve perused our latest issue, you’d know that he recently moved there from Olympia, WA), the impetuses behind the playlist he was kind enough to share with us are not that surprising. As he explains, “In a more perfect world, this would probably be written about what I listen to on tour. Listening to music while driving for hours is probably my preferred way to listen to something. It’s when I feel I get the most out of it. Not to mention the lack of distractions during most of the drive on tour. Unfortunately, I haven’t been on tour in a while. I have been enjoying listening to music at home a lot though. After the embarrassingly nerdy and lengthy undertaking of cataloging all of my vinyl on discogs.com, not to mention discovering their marketplace, I’ve been spending a lot of time with my vinyl. Here’s a bit of what I’ve been listening to and why.”

Feel free to listen along here and pick up a copy of Indian’s excellent new LP here.

Primitive Man–Scorn (2013)
I’m not much for internet music forums but I do post at and read ilovedoom.com. Last January, one of the folks there posted a link to this entire album on YouTube. I was utterly blown away by how dense and heavy and crushing this album sounded, even over YouTube and my shitty laptop speakers. Further research showed that it was a split release between a French and British label. I found the British label’s site first and immediately ordered the vinyl. Luckily for everyone today, Relapse reissued it right away. The best metal record of 2013, without a doubt.

scorn

Waylon Jennings–Honky Tonk Heroes (1973)
Creative control was something that just didn’t happen in country music up through the early ’70s. Waylon Jennings was going to leave RCA specifically because of creative control and RCA relented so they wouldn’t lose him. No one in Nashville’s upper echelon had high expectations of what Waylon would do. Those expectations dropped further when it became known that nearly the entire album would be songs written by an unknown Texas guy named Billy Joe Shaver. Chet Atkins expressed reluctance and lost his role as producer to Tompall Glaser. The record did well enough on its release, but as time went on it has become an essential in honky tonk and launched the still underrated career of Billy Joe Shaver.

waylon

Various Artists–A Short Life Of Trouble: Popular American Ballads 1927-1943 (2013)
Portland, OR’s Mississippi Records releases a lot of great stuff. A lot of old blues stuff, quite a bit of field recordings from Alan Lomax’s Southern Journey sessions in the late ’50s and a lot of other great archival stuff. This album is billed as a collection of “Popular American Ballads 1927-1943″. I only recognized a handful of the artists, although most of the songs are standards or variations thereof. The inclusion of my favorite Carter Family song (“Will You Miss Me When I’m Gone”) next to my favorite John Hurt song (“Louise Collins”) coupled with Mississippi’s reputation was enough to get me to pick it up. This is a great mix of string bands and solo performers and a rather complete picture of the era they were intending to represent.

shortlife

The Devil Makes Three–I’m A Stranger Here (2013)
I love this band. They are my favorite currently active band. I don’t know how to really go about describing them. They will lazily be lumped in with folk or bluegrass or country, which is maybe kind of true. I once did merch for them for a tour and they were opening for a fucking “jamgrass” band, which someone apparently thought was appropriate. Nonetheless, this album is their latest release. It is also their best. They had label backing and a producer for the first time and recorded the rawest record of their career. Percussion has always been rejected by the band and they continue to do so live, but it appears on this form in the shape of things such as a post hole digger wrapped in chains. This one is going to be in heavy rotation on Indian’s upcoming EU tour.

dev

Sewer Goddess–Disciples Of Shit: Live Waste (2011)
Several years ago, Dave from 20 Buck Spin gave me a Sewer Goddess tape with some other tapes and records when I was starting to get seriously interested in noise, industrial, power electronics and the like. I was intrigued and continued to pick her stuff up as I came across it. Black Plagve released this CD in 2011. I generally don’t think that this material translates so well to a live recording but this collection absolutely nails it. The material is five tracks recorded between 2009-2010 and different shows. In more recent years, the material has started to include drums and guitar and this CD was my first exposure to this material. Raw, heavy and fucked up. The band’s output is consistently great but this is the one I come back to most frequently.

*Order From All Purity here.

**We update one Spotify playlist for each new Decibrity entry, so feel free to subscribe to that here.

Past entries include:

Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Alcest

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, January 9th, 2014

Alcest pc William Lacalmontie

The last time I saw Alcest live was March 2012. Neige and company headlined a show at Brooklyn’s Public Assembly (a more fitting setting for them than opening for Enslaved at the Gramercy Theater) and brought along Deafheaven and Vaura. Given the creative leaps both of those openers have made since then with their respective 2013 full-lengths, the prospect of where one of France’s finest exports might go next is pretty darn exciting. While I’ve yet to hear what Shelter has in store, the playlist Neige was kind enough to send over should help pass the time as it spotlights albums that, according to him, not only belong in the “dreamy” genre (one which the frontman is well on his way to conquering), but are related to his band and, in particular, new record. Feel free to listen along here and pre-order a copy of Shelter (which officially drops on the 21st) here.

The Smashing Pumpkins–Siamese Dream (1993)
This album combines heaviness and nostalgic uplifting melodies. The distorted guitars have such a great and massive tone, and the drumming is exceptional. Jimmy Chamberlin is probably my favorite drummer. This album has this perfect bittersweet summer-y feeling, I love to listen to it during holidays drives in July or August and get euphoric feelings from it.

pumpkins

Slowdive–Just For A Day (1991)
That’s the first Slowdive album that I bought and made me fall in love with the band. In the beginning I liked this one even more than their next album, Souvlaki, which is Slowdive’s most popular record. Just For a Day sounds so melancholic to me and I love “Catch the Breeze”, “Waves” and “Brighter”. In the whole indie rock picture, I think Slowdive must be one of the most melancholic ones–their music is pure beauty.

Just_For_a_Day

Dead Can Dance–Dead Can Dance (1984)
In my opinion, the first album from Dead Can Dance is really underrated. I love everything they have done, but back then they played this very interesting mix of early ’80s post-punk, in the way of Joy Division, and ritualistic/dreamy/ethnic sounds. I think all the songs are great, very special, and I never understood why this album didn’t become a classic. I guess it’s because it sounds a bit claustrophobic and strange.

dcd

The Chameleons–Script Of The Bridge (1983)
This is also a very underrated album. I saw The Chameleons a couple of weeks ago in Paris and they were just as awesome live as on their records. To me they have some of the most beautiful guitar work in rock history. The two guitars play different lines, blending together all the time, and the melodies are so catchy. “Second Skin” is my favorite song on this album. This band should have been huge but they had a huge influence on indie music–Interpol for example took a lot from The Chameleons on their first albums.

chameleons

Grimes–Visions (2012)
This is the album I listened to the most in 2013, especially during our recording session in Iceland for Shelter. This is like the weirdest pop album I’ve heard–it has elements from dream pop, industrial, R&B and minimalistic new wave, all very weird and ethereal. It felt so fresh and new to me when I discovered it, like alien music. I like this artist a lot–she is not afraid of any boundaries, crossing styles and making things evolve.

grimes

*Pre-order Shelter here.

**We update one Spotify playlist for each new Decibrity entry, so feel free to subscribe to that here.

Past entries include:

East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: East of the Wall

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

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East of the Wall dropped its fourth full-length a little over two months ago. But just because we’re a little late getting around to praising Redaction Artifacts doesn’t mean that we don’t hold a special place in our grim hearts for the New Jersey quintet, one that’s been ensconced there since The Postman Syndrome’s 2002 magnum opus Terraforming. So we were stoked when guitarist/vocalist Matt Lupo sent us five tracks that give him “memories of warmth”. Given his musical endeavors, the diversity of what helps him deal with this wintry weather is not surprising. Feel free to listen along here and pick up a copy of Redaction Artifacts here.

Guapo’s “III” (from 2005′s Black Oni)
While this isn’t my favorite Guapo song, it’s certainly high on the list. And my favorite (“Five Suns”) is actually an entire album, so I don’t think that counts. I first heard these guys on WFMU while I was driving home form the rehearsal studio around 1am in February of 2004. I got home and sat in my freezing car until the next station break to find out what it was. The DJ played the whole Five Suns album and then forgot to tell his listeners what he just mesmerized us with. So I called the station to ask, and was introduced to a world of dark, brooding, oddness that sounds like it was written 40 years ago. “III” embodies everything that you need to know about this band.

guapo

Unwound’s “Radio Gra” (from 2001′s Leaves Turn Inside You)
Dirge-y and dirty, this instrumental cut from the second disc of Unwound’s swan song album is doom without the doom. It really does come across as the end for this band. Nothing says “it’s curtains” like that melting mellotron. And I love how the bass stays static on the verse for a while before joining up with the other instruments to round out the chord bottoms. Make sure you listen to this whole album if you’re in a cathartic kind of mood.

unwound

Kings of Convenience’s “Failure” (radio edit) (from 2001′s Versus)
It’s never too early to start hunting down that feel good song of the summer. Just had that perfect day at the beach and you’re getting ready to sip some martinis at the cabana? Didn’t think so. But this song will make you want to feel that way. I usually don’t go for remixes, however this one isn’t all that far from the original, and it adds a tasty bit of trumpet to the cocktail.

koc

Sharks Keep Moving’s “Join Up” (from 1999′s Sharks Keep Moving)
You just messed up pretty bad, didn’t you? Yeah, someone’s crying right now and it’s definitely your fault. You just weren’t thinking, were you? Well, you could say something…you could try to make amends. It starts with an apology, an admission of guilt. It requires some introspection, and a plan for avoiding this situation in the future. And then you could both move forward. The trust could eventually be rebuilt, and you would both be stronger for the experience. But that takes time, and you don’t even think it’s worth it, do you?

skm

Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27 (1908)
This here is my favorite piece of symphonic music. The first movement builds so slowly. It peaks, falls, and then climbs even higher. Then it starts sinking…by the five minute mark, you’ve already had such a dramatic experience, but then it branches out and the narrative gets even more interesting. If you can find the version by Edward Downes and the BBC Philharmonic, that’s the one you need.

rachmaninoff

*Order Redaction Artifacts here.

**We update one Spotify playlist for each new Decibrity entry, so feel free to subscribe to that here.

Past entries include:

Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: Enabler

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, December 19th, 2013

enabler horiz

Enabler has had a pretty busy year. Amidst a slew of tour dates (including opening for Rotten Sound throughout the Old World), the group put out two EPs, the most recent of which it dropped last month. As if that wasn’t enough, according to Facebook, the Milwaukeeans are currently tracking their next full-length right now. Despite his hectic schedule, guitarist/vocalist/grizzled vet of everything extreme Jeff Lohrber still had time to tell us about some records–five to be precise–that have helped change the face of his band. Feel free to listen along here. You can pick up a copy from our friends at The Compound here. All hail the void!

Iron Maiden–Powerslave (1984)
I randomly picked up this cassette when I was a kid simply because the cover looked cool. It’s still my favorite Maiden record. Fast forward a couple of years, I come home from work and hear [bassist] Amanda Daniels playing “Aces High” in our living room on bass after picking up the instrument a few months prior. What she didn’t know was that was pretty much her tryout for Enabler!

maiden

Metallica–Master Of Puppets (1986)
This is the ultimate Metallica record in my eyes. It definitely served as a blueprint for how I imagined Enabler working as a unit when we were a four-piece. James Hetfield’s rhythm guitar playing on this record is one of my biggest influences as a guitarist, period.

mop

Nirvana–Live At Reading (2009)
When Enabler was forced to drop to a three-piece, I think hearing this live Nirvana record definitely convinced me that we could successfully continue to pull this off as a three-piece and sound full as a band. This is one of my favorite Nirvana recordings, and ultimately Nirvana live kicks the shit out of the studio records.

nirvana

Harlots–Betrayer (2007)
It feels weird to put a band that I was an irreplaceable member of in a playlist, but the theme we’re going for here is records that have helped change the face of Enabler. If it wasn’t for this record and band, I would have never met Amanda, and [guitarist] Eric [Dunn] wouldn’t have been a part of Enabler for the past year. I feel like I pushed myself to my creative and technical limits in this band to where coming back and writing more standard songs has just been a breeze (and a lot more fun!). I look at the other members of Harlots like family and think about them often.

Rotten Sound–Cycles (2008)
I slept on this band for years and was introduced to Rotten Sound while I was drumming for Trap Them. The first three songs on this record are probably the most crushing and punishing grind I’ve ever heard, and the production is amazing! I would say that hearing this definitely pushed me to write a lot of the more brutal riffs in Enabler and influenced me to just up the par with speed and intensity. Fast forward a few years and we were able to tour Europe with them this past year and are great friends!

*Photo by John Mourlas Photography

**Order Flies here.

***We update one Spotify playlist for each new Decibrity entry, so feel free to subscribe to that here.

Past entries include:

Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)