Search results for 'call of the void':

Not Fade Away: Exclusive Call of the Void Stream!

By: Shawn Macomber Posted in: exclusive, featured On: Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

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Damn, this new Call of the Void joint has some cool textures on it. Featuring a sort of His Hero Is Gone by way of latter day Napalm Death sound, Ageless goes a lot of interesting places, both sonically and compositionally.

The record is out next week via Relapse, but we’ve got the full-stream for you this morning along with the following preamble from guitarist Patrick Alberts:

Lyrically Ageless is a personal call to arms. Hatred, love, disappointment and fear are feelings we are all privy to. Age is not a requirement. Music has always been a personal escape for everyone in our band and Ageless is the album we have always wanted to write. Music is the one thing everyone in the world enjoys and it always stands the test of time. Again, age is not a requirement. We have been sitting on this record since April of 2014 and we are very relieved to finally release it. If you have pre-oredered the album already, thank you for the support it means the world to us. We’ll see you on the road.

Upcoming tour dates with Enabler after the jump

Decibrity Playlist: Call Of The Void

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, May 9th, 2013

cotv-97

When Call of the Void is not on the road (most recently in support of recently released Dragged Down A Dead End Path), guitarist Patrick Alberts returns to work and, as he describes it, deals with PTSD (“Post Tour Super Depression”). Having never been on tour, I can’t identify other than to say that his feelings still probably encapsulate those who endure the daily grind with no tour break in sight. We’ll let Alberts take it from here: “It doesn’t help that Colorado has amazing weather during the month April and being stuck inside working is not the greatest thing on Earth. That being said, there can’t be good without evil, and working is what enables me to afford touring. Working isn’t so bad, but after three weeks of fun, work is the last place you want to be. I thought a personal twist would not be as banal as a top five, so sorry if this strays outside the format, but I was inspired by a famous Billy Madison quote: ‘I drew the duck blue because I’ve never seen a blue duck before and to be honest with ya, I wanted to see a blue duck.'”

Monday: Defeat

Buried At Sea’s “Migration (Part 1)” (from 2003’s Migration)
Besides Migration being one of the heaviest records ever made, it also happens to sound like the soundtrack to the end of the world, which is what it feels like heading to work on the first day being back from tour. From the opening strike of the Moog, the engine starts in my car and once my brain realizes I’m headed to work, all the lyrics turn into “NOOOOO, NOOOOOO, NOOOOOO”. Try screaming “NO” over the vocals, it works out nicely. Coincidentally, the track time for part one perfectly aligns with how long it takes me to get to work. I will take this moment to also tell Buried At Sea to make more records, damnit.

Tuesday: Uncertainty

NoMeansNo’s “It’s Catching Up” (from 1989’s Wrong)
I’ve been thinking about what the hell I’m going to have to deal with when I get back to work since the day we left. Currently my position at work is being terminated and I have to find a new one. Whatever decision I make, I feel I won’t be as satisfied as I am now. This is very unsettling. Time is catching up with me and it is time to make a decision and possibly take a pay cut or do something I’m uninterested in. Besides that, NoMeansNo kicks ass.

nmn

Wednesday: Acceptance/Fuck It, Good Times

Frank Zappa And The Mothers Of Invention’s “Sofa No. 1″ (from 1975’s One Size Fits All)
Humans have the great ability to adjust and cope in a very short amount of time–at this point any neurosis associated with work has subsided. Time to say fuck it and move along with the ebb and flow of the days. Cool story bro, anyways…Zappa has the ability to make some of the most enjoyable music in the world and the clarity of acceptance matches the feeling of the coolest Frank Zappa track ever recorded. We all need more Zappa in our lives.

zappa

Thursday: Is A Shitty Band

Goatsnake’s “Raw Curtains” (from 2000’s Burning Witch/Goatsnake split)
Cannibal Corpse’s “From Skin To Liquid” (from 1998’s Gallery Of Suicide)

By Thursday, everything is in check and work is now caught up. Also Thursday is the most worthless day of the week, what the fuck happens on Thursdays? Oh, you’re DJing tonight and I should come out? No. So what the fuck do you do when you have a desk job and your PR agent asks you to do a top five list? You fucking listen to every sweet song that you wish you wrote over and over again and fantasize that you are going to make the sweetest top five ever. Everything is better in twos and since each lack vocals, it only counts as one song…lay off dude.

goatsnake

Friday: Relief

Harvey Milk’s “I Just Want To Go Home” (from 2010’s A Small Turn Of Human Kindness)
Fuck yes, it’s Friday! The worst day, just kidding! It is only the worst day because the anticipation of the weekend makes time slow down so much that even Chris Brown would understand why you hate him for beating the shit out of Rhianna. Maybe it is just me, but the last few hours of the work shift are painfully slow and it is a struggle to stay there to get the full complete eight hours in without saying fuck it is only a few dollars. All I can think about is “I just want to go home.” Fortunately for me, Harvey Milk knew I was doing this blog post three years ago and aptly titled a song for my convenience. They couldn’t have written a song that could make me more antsy to leave work for the weekend.

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*Order a copy of Dragged Down A Dead End Path here.

**We update one Spotify playlist for each new Decibrity entry, so feel free to subscribe to that here. Past entries include:

Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Fest or No Fest, Don’t Call it a Fest Promises to be Pretty Awesome

By: kevin.stewart-panko Posted in: exclusive, featured, interviews On: Thursday, August 7th, 2014

deciblog - dcitf horiz

Next Friday the 15th, the inaugural Don’t Call it a Fest slams into the Motor City with all the impact of a severely downgraded credit rating and an avalanche of housing foreclosures. Even during the best of times, Detroit has always had a negative air surrounding it; some of that civic black eye has been all too entirely justified, some has had its fires flamed due to a long-standing international game of telephone. Either way, Don’t Call it a Fest hopes to spread some positive vibes to a hurting metropolis via the local (and beyond) extreme music community by bringing Magrudergrind, Young and in the Way, Dangers, the Banner, Full of Hell, Homewrecker, Architect, Graf Orlock, Cloud Rat, Holy and more to the Tangent Gallery for what promises to be a grand old time all of the low, low price of $15 advance/$20 at the door! We recently caught up with Maxwell, one half of the team putting this shindig together, for a little background on the fest and to help put the pieces of the city’s true nature together.

What can you tell us about your history as promoter and Don’t Call it a Fest?
This is the first year for the festival. My roommate and myself, we decided to put it together. I’ve been booking shows for about 14-15 years. Originally, I started in Iowa because that’s where I grew up. I was just playing in bands, then I started booking stuff. Then, all of a sudden one band from out of town will come in to play, then they spread word to so-and-so and then I had booking agents hitting me up. When you have a small enough market where kids are desperate for music, it was pretty easy to get bigger crowds. I was 15 years-old and having bigger packages come in and was able to get the band $2000 on a weekday because there’s nothing else happening; who wouldn’t want to go to those markets? That’s pretty much how it started. I moved to Detroit three years ago and just kind of started booking up here because I’d been touring through here for a couple years at that point and had made a lot of friends here.

That begs the next question: you voluntarily moved to Detroit? Why?
Yeah, I’ve heard that a lot [laughs]. Essentially, how it started was that I came up here for the first time in 2006 and I played the scariest club ever. It was literally in the worst neighbourhood you could find anywhere, but I made a few friends that night, despite everything which is a whole story in itself. From there, I ended up meeting a few people who would end up becoming band mates a couple years down the line. It was kind of the right time and I needed to do something new, so I came up here so I could continue playing music and make it more frequent. This was the best way to go about it.

Time for some self-promotion: what bands are you playing in?
Sender Receiver, Sawchuk and Deadchurch.

What was the impetus for the fest? Was there a particular reason you made the leap from doing shows to doing the fest?
It was more that we wanted to do something that was substantial here in Detroit. There are a lot of people who do shows now that have 12 bands on them that are almost all local with maybe one out of town band from maybe two hours away and they call it a fest with some big elaborate hokey name. We wanted to showcase bands from around the country and some from out of the country and kind of bring something cool like that here. There used to be a lot of sweet fests up here in Michigan, but not really anymore. So I guess it was kind of an anti-fest fest, stabbing at the all-local thing and trying to bring some cool bands in.

Being that this is your first year doing it, how has it been in terms of organisation?
There have definitely been some difficulties coming in. There aren’t really many big venues here willing to work with people without wanting more money than they’re worth. There’s no reason to be paying $1400 for a 500 capacity room; that’s just not cost effective for anyone. These places have their own in-house agents. I won’t say the name of the company, but they’re around the country, they own multiple venues and they only care about having people work with them directly so they’re going to try and have everybody charge a lot. There was that, but there’s a really cool space we’re using. It’s got two rooms in it so we’re able to go with two different stages, back-to-back with a five minute turnover. That was pretty much the main difficulty. I guess also having people and bands outside of friends and personal contacts wanting to take a chance and come out to Detroit because the city has its own reputation.

deciblog - dcitf vert

What differences have you noticed in putting this together versus a regular show?
I guess there’s a lot of excitement around here, but we’ve noticed a lot of excitement and interest from out of state. There are so many shows always going on in Detroit. It seems like somebody is always doing something that everybody’s kind of spoiled here, I guess is a way of putting it. We’ve had a good reception, it’s just that people are sort of like, “oh, cool. It’s another cool thing that’s happening.” People are kind of used to it. But, I’m noticing from the surrounding areas, like the other side of the state, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and parts of southern Ontario, that people are super-excited because it’s a cheap festival with a lot of bands people want to see coming together. But, like I said, here in Detroit, there are literally five or six shows going on every night of the week.

Ok, so here’s your chance to dispel any of the myths surrounding the city of Detroit. I spent some unavoidable time wandering the city for a day when I went to see Raw Power there last year and it was pretty barren and sort of post-apocalyptic. Most people have heard about the city bankruptcy, the auto industry troubles, the former mayor being in jail, the water being shut off recently…Is it a case of the arts community thriving in light of – or because of – all the shit going on in mainstream business, government and politics?
Oh yeah! I mean, right here it’s almost like a cesspool of almost every type of culture and art. Probably one of the main things that drew me here, aside from music, was that you can come here with nothing and create something. Everybody is kind of almost in it together in the sense that we’re all not doing so hot, but for the people who are, like you said, into art of any type of medium, you don’t need a ton of money to have a studio space. Generally, in most cities, it’s going to cost you a couple grand and you’re going to have to split a space with other people. Here, you can rent or get a facility for next to nothing because people will take that. Plus, when everybody around is kind of a little bit down or depressed, that breeds a lot of creativity and a lot of people are trying to do really cool things. We all get it, but it’s hard to explain unless you’re here.

In booking shows and tour stops, do you have to often convince bands that it’s worth it stopping in Detroit? I’m sure the farther away you are from the city, the more outlandish the stories about how decrepit the city is are.
That’s for sure. In terms of crime or at least feeling you’re going to get mugged or something, it’s not really worse here than any other major city. I’ve had worse experiences elsewhere in the country, I’ll say that much. Since I’ve moved here, I personally haven’t had too much happen, but I’ve had way worse happen everywhere else. You’d be surprised how many people want to play Detroit, if only to just say they played here [laughs]. I guess it’s the rougher areas, like here and Oakland or something, that have their own thing about them. A lot of people want to play Detroit, especially Detroit house shows and that’s the mainly what I like to do because I’ve run a couple different houses since I’ve moved here and we do a lot of different stuff from smaller to bigger bands. This year alone we’ve had the Banner, Shai Hulud, the last Mongoloids show was in my basement, so I mean there have been a lot of pretty large events. People will literally go, “oh, we’re playing Detroit, at a house” and in many minds it’s cool because it’s where punk rock was pretty much created. It feels right, so a lot of people are really open to the idea when they see that, on a weeknight kids are willing to cram into a basement, go nuts, buy merch and hang out. There’s a pretty cool community going on here.

Tell us about the venue the fest is being held in. It looks like a multi-use sort of place, but did you have to do any amount of convincing to let them use their space?
They were pretty open about it and really excited when they heard what we wanted to do with the multiple room, all-day thing. They’ve done a lot shows there; surprisingly, there have been a lot of black metal shows there, but they also do a lot of community art shows and people do book signings and stuff. They’re pretty open to just about anything.

Is it your intention to do this annually?
We would like to. Both me and my roommate Nick are both going full force on it and we’d like to make that happen if we could. If people are into it we’ll definitely do it again.

If it is a success – however you define success – what do you think you’d in the future? Have you even thought about the future beyond getting through year one?
We’ve definitely thought about it as there has been a good response and a lot of support. People who couldn’t commit this year – it wasn’t a last minute thing, but we only had a couple months to organise this in comparison to other people or fests who plan six months to a year ahead – have talked about wanting to play next year. Hopefully maybe we can make it a two-day thing and fly out some more friends from the west coast or bands from the southeast and Florida.

For more info and to order tickets, check out www.dontcallitafest.com

Happy 100 Call & Response: Mr. Ed Guesses Scores Given Old Decibel Reviews

By: Dan Lake Posted in: featured, stupid crap On: Friday, January 18th, 2013

albertmudrian

Have you heard?  Decibel Magazine just launched its 100th issue!  We’ve kinda kept it quiet, only hyping it every other day or so for only the past several months.  Turns out we’re hosting a celebration show in Philly this weekend!  Who knew?  I wonder who will headline…

As this extremely extreme monument edged closer to becoming reality, dB think tank Nick Green came down with a serious case of the good ideas (a chronic condition with that dude):  Since EiC Albert Mudrian assures us that he can divine any review’s numerical score from the tone of the review text itself, why not test this claim with a variety of selections from the past 100 issues?  Thus was born this exclusive Deciblog special edition Call & Response.

We sent our most beloved extreme music addict six old reviews, identified only by title (with the score and author’s name removed).  He responded to them with pithy anecdotes and, in at least one case, without actually reading the review!

The Mars Volta – The Bedlam in Goliath
Score:  3          Author:  Brent Burton                        Published:  #42, April 2008
The Mars Volta, it seems, worked on their latest record until it was so full of jazzy, funky, neo-progressive nonsense that it couldn’t hold another note. It is everything against which punk rock was directed. Which is too bad, because these guys are obviously talented, and if 2003 debut De-Loused in the Comatorium is any measure, capable of some interesting songwriting.

On Bedlam in Goliath, however, everything takes a back seat to vocal and instrumental pyrotechnics. The band’s fourth proper full-length is so showy and dense that it’s easy to forget that it contains actual songs. The problem, of course, is that they can’t leave well enough alone. They pile off-kilter rhythms on top of off-kilter rhythms—many of which are performed at breckneck tempos. Guitarist Omar Rodriguez-Lopez treats each song as if it were an opportunity to show off everything he knows. And vocalist Cedric Bixler-Zavala sings as if he’s paid by the word. Just when you think it can’t get any thicker or
more obtuse, they’ll throw in a swirling synth or a snaky sax.  Everything about this record stinks of overindulgence.

It’s easy to imagine these guys hearing one of Miles Davis’ dense jazz-rock albums and thinking, “This would be great if only it were faster and more complex.” But it wouldn’t. It would be impenetrable. It would sound just like The Bedlam in Goliath.

Albert Says:  5.  I remember Bonzo dragged me to see them at the Electric Factory in, like, 2005. They were awful, but I was I drunk enough to heckle “’One-Armed Scissor,’ Motherfucker!”

Bring Me the Horizon – Suicide Season
Score:  8          Author:  Kirk Miller                Published:  #50, December 2008
The best moment of this year’s Warped Tour (yes, there were actual best moments) happened in Long Island, when U.K. metal newcomer Bring Me the Horizon found themselves performing on the stage next to pop starlet Katy Perry… or, more specifically, next to the stage where she was just about to perform. Intentionally or not, BMTH cut into the “I Kissed a Girl” singer’s set by a good 10 minutes, encouraging the audience to start a circle pit around the sound tech, eliciting an audience chant of “We will never sleep! Sleep is for the weak!” and, in general, scarring the minds of 13-year-old pop fans forever.

So the guys have energy and sass—do they have chops? Yep. Sure, the whole of Suicide Season leans on familiar hardcore tempos and repeated choruses, making the band’s assault easy to digest; it’s not pop, but it’s certainly on the lighter side of the metalcore spectrum. But the underlying viciousness is ever-present, with “The Comedown” and “Football Season Is Over” sneaking into DevilDriver territory (thanks to vocalist Oli Sykes’ screeches, a vocal tic he otherwise avoids). At their best, the songs are memorable noise, chock full of easy-to-chant choruses, most specifically on “Chelsea Smile” (“Repent! Repent!”) and “Diamonds Aren’t Forever” (the “sleep is for the weak” track).

Admittedly, the screamo closer/title track is, well, “so gay” (to quote Ms. Perry’s other hit), but otherwise, Bring Me the Horizon are a welcome visitor to these shores… and, hopefully, a bad pop concert near you.

Albert Says:  8. This author HAS to be Catherine Yates. She’s the original Kirk Miller of the reviews section.

Jello Biafra with the Melvins – Never Breathe What You Can’t See
Score:  5          Author:  J Bennett                  Published:  #2, November 2004
Theoretically, this is one of those records that should, at the very least, be “okay.”  But, as much as I’d love to, I just can’t get it up for this one. Honestly? Jello Biafra fronting the Melvins doesn’t really sound like that hot of an idea. I like “Holiday In Cambodia” and “Too Drunk to Fuck” as much as the next snide asshole who was too young to get into the Dead Kennedys before they broke up, but I guess I like my Melvins over here and my Jello Biafra over there. Preferably way over there. With Fred Schneider and Johnny Ramone. But that’s judging a book by its cover, I suppose. It’s when you actually put the album on that the real disappointment starts. Swear to god, on “McGruff the Crime Dog,” Biafra implores us to “take a bite out of crime.” “Wholly Buy Bull” is the kind of Ventures’ carnival music that doesn’t sound good when Mr. Bungle actually pull it off at three times the speed; mid-paced, with Jello’s cartoonish warble railing against “the Evil Empire” (while one can certainly appreciate the similarities between the Reagan and Dubya administrations, something tells me Jello has had this one on the back-burner since the Gipper was running guns out of the Oval Office), it just gets tedious. On the other hand, it is the Melvins, and there is a song about McGruff the Crime Dog. Not to mention another one called “Voted off the Island.” So it’s got that going for it, which is nice.

Albert Says:  5. Pretty sure this is Bennett. He only reviews, 9s, 5s and zeros.

Kittie – Never Again
Score:  8          Author:  Andrew Parks           Published:  #19, May 2006
Anyone else remember when Kittie were hyped on one of MTV’s “You Hear It First” segments? That geek chic blowhard Gideon Yago––or maybe it was the best bald TV personality ever, Matt Pinfield—was all like, “whoa, this Morgan Lander chick can scream and shit!” (Plus, she’s hot in a damaged girl way, said his inner dialogue.) As if it were a revelation that a woman can rock, let alone lead a savage metal quartet with a screaming, screeching single called “Spit.” They’ve lost half their lineup in the decade since (everyone but Lander and sister/drummer Mercedes), but this digital-only EP (download it from iTunes to get all four tracks) props 2006 up as a promising year for the quartet.

A clear teaser, it shows four distinct sides: the Pantera scream/Sabbath stomp/slight guitar solo side (the title track), the Rice Krispie crunchy, melodic modern rock side (“Breathe”), the schizo, Morgan-got-range side (“This Too Shall Pass”), and the sorta soaring power ballad side, with a hefty bottom end and persistent riffage (“Everything That Could Have Been”). Here comes the clichéd pun to cap this review off, then: Kittie have their claws sharpened, so you best watch out for their LP later this year. Meeee-yow! You heard it here first, folks.

Albert Says:  7. Fuck you for making me remember Gideon Yago.

Static-X – Cannibal
Score:  6          Author:  Daniel Lukes                        Published:  #31, May 2007
If you ever needed proof that the cliché “any publicity is good publicity” is bullshit, then the vicissitudes of Static-X—never media darlings in the first place—over the last couple of years should suit you fine. What puzzles is that in these days of “nü-metal sucked all along” orthodoxy, they’re still on a major label. Fact is, for anyone who cares to look beyond the big hair, dumb lyrics and “evil disco” shtick—or will admit that we’ll probably find Trivium or Killswitch as mockworthy in five or so years (or even now)—Static-X have always been a pretty decent band, whether grinding out straight-up Prong/White Zombie/Ministry industrial metal, or indulging in Korn/Deadsy-style balladry à la “Cold” or “Just in Case.”

Reports on Cannibal promised a heavier outlook, and in some respects Static-X have noticeably moved with the times. This fifth (!) album not only sounds decidedly thrashier, but is definitely also the least pop-metal they’ve ever been: “No Submission” could almost be a mechanized Deicide. Most notable in their (understandable) desire to appeal to the “we grew up on milk and Maiden” crowd is the fact that Cannibal is plastered with (widdlesomely impressive, actually) solos, courtesy of returning member Koichi Fukuda, who on “Cuts You Up” even sounds like Bill Steer! Those who aren’t ashamed to ’fess up as fans will find moments to enjoy here—the lead-laden Celldweller techno rave part in “Behemoth,” the classic Static-X groove of “Destroyer” that could be right off 2001’s Machine—but there’s also much energy-lacking, uninspired Static-by-rote filler, and on the whole Cannibal tends to smack somewhat of that typical syndrome of bands going for “heavy” over “creative, interesting or different,” as if the two options were mutually exclusive.

Albert Says:  6. This is amazingly prophetic: “Fact is, for anyone who cares to look beyond the big hair, dumb lyrics and “evil disco” shtick—or will admit that we’ll probably find Trivium or Killswitch as mockworthy in five or so years (or even now).”

 [Pay close attention to this last review for two reasons:  a) the second paragraph might be the best writing in the history of writing; b) the final sentence paired with Mr. Mudrian’s guess give me the giggles, and I see no reason you shouldn’t share in the mirth.]

Pendulum – Immersion
Score:  1          Author:  Shane Mehling          Published:  #77, March 2011
This review was initially written in the span of the first six-and-a-half-minute song. It was like a fugue state that ended with a compendium of insult after insult that picked apart the generic, almost abusive electronica-rock rubbish that was expelling from my speakers. And this was before I heard the vocals.

What can I say about Pendulum’s Immersion that hasn’t been said about shitting your pants in a restaurant? This is the kind of music that you hear in foreign movies and think, “The radio sucks, but at least I’m not in that dance club right now.” I would love to be more erudite, but the bottom line is this is music for stupid babies.

I mean, would I rather listen to modern R&B? Like actually choose to listen to the new record by Maxwell instead? Actually, I think I would. Hell, I’d rather hear a mob of women laugh at my failure to maintain an erection than plow through “Watercolour” again.

The reason I’m not giving Pendulum a zero is because maybe, like certain forms of extreme music, there is a level of skill and taste that I’m just not accustomed to and can’t appreciate. Possibly if someone more versed in the genre pinpointed the highlights and explained why these are revolutionary or awe-inspiring, I’d realize that I just wasn’t giving Immersion a fair shake. But the reason I’m giving it a one is because if I’m wrong, I don’t want to be right.

Albert Says:  2. I’m not confident in that at all. Something tells me we did something dicky with the rating as we are want to do with a writer mentions the number in the body of the review. Also, is this Frank?

Call & Response with Dethklok

By: ben.buckner Posted in: On: Wednesday, June 21st, 2000

dethklok

To honor the release of their second full-length album, The Dethalbum II, Decibel sent Dethklok bassist William Murderface and guitarist Toki Wartooth seven MP3s, each identified only by title. Here’s what our favorite two-dimensional artists had to say about our selections.

Track 01

Behemoth, “Ov Fire and the Void”
from: Evangelion
[THE SKINNY] Polish sausage/war party
Wartooth: Oh! Dis is froms like my fovrites bands Behemoth! And its likes so good likes Demigod. I thinks these guys gets better and better. Da drummer keeps gettings faster ands faster buts still with a nice live sounds nots all too triggered soundings.
Murderface: Why don’t you marry them?
Wartooth: Oh fucks you, fat tits. Likes you could even plays half the bass in dis band.
Murderface: I’m better than Orcus,
remember him?
Wartooth: You are not.
Murderface: I know.
Wartooth: Anyways, dis bands is the best and keeps definings a style what’s is just more uniques and it’s one of the few bands whats I really looks forwards to wonderings what’s greats things they keeps doings in da futures. They are the most touringest hardest workings band in the worlds, too.
Murderface: Like James Brown.
Wartooth: Likes da blacks football player whats fucked Raquel Welch in dat movie?
Murderface: Never mind. They don’t even know how to spell “of.”
Wartooth: Dey spells it the cool way,
you dildo licker.

Track 02

Javelina, “You’re Going to Hate This”
from: Beasts Among Sheep
[THE SKINNY] Repping the AmRep sound
Murderface: That’s not fair because the song title says, “You’re going to hate this” and then if you do, you feel like a conformist sap and you feel compelled to say, “No… I like it.”
Wartooth: Well?
Murderface: I hate it.
Wartooth: I don’t. It’s kinda likes a crummy Napalm Death, which is better thans like a really good Creed or Threes Doors Down or some shit.
Murderface: I think they should have let their guitars feedback for the whole song instead of the first 30 seconds. Stupid.
Wartooth: I would sees them live and likes to hear more stuff froms them. It’s likes OK. Kinda good.
Murderface: Oh, aren’t you so diplomatic? Maybe you could have tea with them and blow them.
Wartooth: Aww fucks you, Dogface. You wishes you could have a side band dis good.
Murderface: Are they looking for a bass player? Did you hear something?

To read the entire article, purchase this issue from our online store.

Call & Response with Sigh

By: ben.buckner Posted in: On: Saturday, June 17th, 2000

sigh_cred_Dave-Cardoso

Because Euronymous was backing them, we sent Sigh vocalist/keyboardist Mirai Kawashima and saxophonist Dr. Mikannibal seven MP3s, each identified only by title. Here’s what our favorite post-black, avant-garde metal experimentalists had to say about our selections.

Track 01

Ludicra, “Clean White Void”
from: The Tenant
[THE SKINNY] Renew this lease!
Kawashima: The main riff is really strong; it’s simple and memorable, and definitely being in quintuple time gives a hook to the song. The vocal is really original! This is surely heavy and groovy, and it’s very different, too. I can’t tell what genre this belongs to. Some parts sound like stoner stuff, while others are like technical death metal. I like it a lot.

Track 02

Mournful Congregation, “Elemental”
from: Rising of Yog-Sothoth:
Tribute to Thergothon
[THE SKINNY] Funeral doom forefathers
finally get their due
Kawashima: I remember listening to this kind of music (funeral doom?) in the early ’90s. This isn’t bad at all; especially the vocal style is very deep and impressive. It’s even difficult to detect from when this song is from. This could be the early ’90s, but this could be today’s [recording]. The German label named Barbarian Wrath was releasing stuff in this vein in the early ’90s, if my memory serves correct. Back then, the owner of the label once called me at five in the morning and his first words were, “What time is it in Japan?” This has nothing to do with this article, though. If I was stoned now, I’d be enjoying this much more!

To read the entire article, purchase this issue from our online store.

Call and Response with Through the Eyes of the Dead

By: ben.buckner Posted in: On: Saturday, June 17th, 2000

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Because we like his band’s new album Skepsis more than Shane Mehling does, we sent Through
the Eyes of the Dead guitarist Justin Longshore six MP3s, each identified only by title. Here’s what our favorite South Carolina resident who doesn’t fuck the same horse multiple times had to say about our selections.

Track 01

Dark Tranquillity, “I Am the Void”
from: We Are the Void
[THE SKINNY] They are the void
The thrash intro riff really threw me off, but once the vocals kicked in I knew this had to be Dark Tranquillity. I was really into the Swedish metal scene in high school, so I’m familiar with the band. I’ve owned a few of their records throughout the years and, despite its bad production, I think The Gallery is arguably one of the best melodic metal releases ever (Agreed. See page 52—ed]. I also think these dudes are really good songwriters. Our old guitarist actually borrowed [2005’s]Character from me years ago, and it accidentally fell out of his truck when he was returning it to me. He put the car in reverse and ran over the CD by accident, but it was still intact (although the case was destroyed). I put it on later and everything was fine—only one song skipped. Props to Dark Tranquillity for releasing some of the best melodic metal and CDs that can withstand extreme conditions.

Track 02

Immolation, “In Human Form”
from: Majesty and Decay
[THE SKINNY] Sadly, not in the form of a giant sloar!
I wonder if these guys realize that Death used this song title in ’93 on Individual Thought Patterns. At first, I was stoked thinking this was going to be a cover of that song. Extreme death metal has usually been hit-or-miss with me lately. I love the genre just as much as the next guy, but it has to have some type of originality to really strike me. I grew up listening to a lot of the earlier death metal (Suffocation, Death, Morbid Angel, Cannibal Corpse, etc.). To me, those bands were in the same genre, but had their own personality and really brought something exciting and new to that era. This song is really cool, actually, and sounds a lot like Immolation. I heard they were coming out with a new record in 2010, so I’m going to guess this is a song from that release. There is some unorthodox drumming going on with this, which is pretty cool to hear rather than three minutes of blast beat variations. Overall, a very awesome song and sounds like the Immolation I remember: the most brutal, chaotic and pure evil New York death metal band period.

To read the entire article, purchase this issue from our online store.

INTERVIEW: Pit Full Of Shit

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews On: Thursday, August 28th, 2014

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If you’ve been to shows around the NYC area–particularly at The Acheron or Saint Vitus Bar, both in Brooklyn–then chances are you’ve seen Frank Huang. More often than not, he’s armed with at least one video camera to capture that night’s show for everyone else’s viewing pleasure. After noticing him time after time at gigs, we finally caught up with the man himself about his work, his life and music in general. If you haven’t already, be sure to check out his blog Pit Full of Shit.

For those who may not be familiar, tell us a little bit about Pit Full of Shit. How did the idea come about? When did you you first get started and what was the first show you shot?
I started shooting live video when I was back in Taiwan around 2007. It began with a school project I made for my friends’ band called Horsemen. I was trying to shoot a short documentary on them. At the time, there was this series of shows called “Metal Monster”, and the band was one of the organizers of the show. So I went in and shot the second show of the series in which Chthonic played. I believe it was the peak of the series. After the show, I found I really liked filming bands and the music, and I felt that since I knew how to shoot video, these bands deserved to be documented. Plus, I could also show our scene to the world (aka the Internet). After that, I kind of just fell into this abyss and never got to get out. I got some really good experience when I was over there, not only shooting local bands but also bands like Abigail, Unholy Grave, Misery Index, Exodus and Death Angel. I’m still good friends with some of the people in those bands, and that really helped me start up when I first moved to States.

Pit Full of Shit didn’t start until I moved to NYC in 2011. I met Frank Godla from Metal Injection and Meek Is Murder at Revocation’s Chaos of Forms record release show at The Studio at Webster Hall. We were both shooting the show, and he suggested that we edit our footage together and post it on Metal Injection. After that project, they offered me a channel on Metal Injection, and that’s how Pit Full of Shit came about. But two years later, MI decided to change its server and all of my videos were gone, and that was when I started the blog. Right now I still post videos both on my blog and Metal Injection, but the source is from my own YouTube channel instead of MI’s server.

Most of your live footage is from shows in and around NYC — how long have you lived around here? What’s your favorite local venue to see a show and to shoot a show?
I moved to NYC from Taiwan in the summer of 2011 for grad school, so it’s been around three years now. If you look into the videos I’ve shot, you will find that in terms of venues, Saint Vitus Bar and The Acheron are the two places I shoot at the most. I can’t really pick just one from those two. Both of places took care of me pretty well when I first started in NYC, are very, very friendly, and believe and are very supportive of the things I do, which means a lot to me personally.

Taking another step back, tell us about some of your formative music experiences — in particular, when and how did you first get into the more extreme side of things?
Well this sounds really corny, but I started listening to Marilyn Manson when I was in junior high school which led me to Slipknot. (This is Taiwan we are talking about, I didn’t really get to find that much information on extreme music, not to mention the Internet wasn’t that cool at that time. Hell, I even liked Limp Bizkit. But it’s 2014, it’s way much easier to find underground music now.) But I always felt like I wanted something heavier. When I got into college, my friends showed me bands like Chthonic and Arch Enemy, and that was when I started digging more extreme music. Bands like Dark Funeral and Naglfar were my favorites at the time, and shooting shows exposed me to a lot of other music too.

There’s a group in Taiwan called Raw Noise Attack. They were the ones that got Abigail and Unholy Grave to play in Taiwan, and they also introduced me to bands like Electric Wizard, Church of Misery and so many other thrash or grind bands that shaped a lot of my musical tastes nowadays.

How many shows a month do you think you shoot? What’s been a favorite recent show you’ve been able to share with everyone? All time?
I would say I shoot about 10 to 15 shows a month, but it really depends on what’s going on. Sometimes I shoot five or six nights a week, sometimes one night in two weeks. It really depends. I would say my favorite recent show was Eyehategod with Iron Reagan and Strong Intention at The Acheron. All time for now I would give it to Gorguts at Saint Vitus Bar–that set completely blew my mind.

Can you tell us more about the equipment you use to shoot shows and the process more generally?
For cameras, I mainly use my Canon 60D. If I’m doing a multicam shoot, I have a Sony VG10 and a GoPro. Soundwise, I use a Sony PCM-D50, which is a really old sound recorder I’ve been using since the beginning but it’s still amazing and a Zoom H4n for board sound. And for editing I use Adobe Premiere Pro and PluralEyes for sound syncing (it’s life saver). Sometimes I try to do different things too, like I shot Eyehategod in Super 8mm film earlier this year.

What are some of your other videography/filmmaking endeavors (music videos, documentaries, etc)?
I’ve actually done music videos for bands like Phobia (and here), White Widows Pact, Bezoar, Call of The Void, Rituals, Noisear, Skelptarsis and Scattered Purgatory from Taiwan. The latest music video I made was for Phoenix’s Funerary, which premiered on Noisey.

Do you ever feel that you’re missing out on the “live experience” by being behind the camera instead of in the crowd? Do you try and mix it up and not shoot every show you go to?
Yes I do, haha, but if you see me at a show with my camera, you would most likely see me headbanging to songs all of the time, so I’m not missing out that much. And sometimes when I do a multicam shoot, I will be at the front of the stage, which to be honest can be really annoying sometimes.

I actually tried going to shows without my camera, but I found I would feel very uncomfortable, and normally after the show I would be like “Fuck, I should’ve shot that show.” So normally I shoot every show I go to, unless there are special reasons like the venue charges a ridiculous amount of money just to bring in a camera, which is totally stupid and greedy in my opinion.

What do you otherwise like to do when you’re not going to shows?
Movies. I’m a film school graduate and it gets me excited that NYC has so much to offer in terms of movies. Especially places like the IFC Center, Lincoln Center and BAM [Brooklyn Academy of Music], which always come up with some of the best programs on indie, classic or even cult movies.

For those who haven’t had a chance to go there, what’s so special about Saint Vitus?
Saint Vitus Bar is a place for everyone who loves metal–you can’t really go wrong when you have a King Diamond portrait in the middle of the bar. They play all good songs in the bar, the drinks are very nice and don’t miss out on their buns!

And to me it feels like home. The people who work there know about the music, they are involved in the scene and most of them play in metal bands too. So they actually understand what is like being a metalhead. And they also book some of the best shows in Brooklyn. But don’t be an asshole and ruin other people’s good time, they will be total jerks to you if you do so. But just in general in life, DON’T BE AN ASSHOLE.

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What are some tunes you’ve been spinning recently?
2014 has been an awesome year in terms of new releases. I’ve been obsessed with the new Gridlink, Indian, Eyehategod, Coffinworm and Triptykon records. But I’ve been going back to SubRosa’s More Constant Than the Gods for the past week.

Anything else you’d like to add?
Be nice and respectful to all the videographers and photographers you see at any show.

Past Decibrity Playlists

By: zach.smith Posted in: uncategorized On: Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

***Past Decibrity entries include:

Ruby the Hatchet
Melechesh
Karma to Burn
Primordial
Giant Squid (Part 1) (Part 2)
Bastard Feast
Encoffination
Obituary
Revocation
Winterfylleth (Part 1) (Part 2)
Hark
Lazer/Wulf
Young Widows (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mutilation Rites
Misery Index
Goatwhore
North
Tombs
Sadgiqacea
The Atlas Moth
Arch Enemy
Archspire
Cormorant
Eyehategod (Part 1) (Part 2)
Floor
Iron Reagan
Fight Amp
Cynic
Melt-Banana
Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)

Decibrity Playlist: North

By: zach.smith Posted in: featured, interviews, listen, lists On: Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

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I first read about North via Catherine Yates’ review of What You Were back in 2008, but it wasn’t until I perused our Managing Editor’s writeup of the record in that year’s top 40 that I thankfully got around to listening. Even though it’s been a while since then, once you’ve read last year’s interview with guitarist Matt Mutterperl, all I really need to tell you about what the Arizonians have been up to recently is that they dropped a self-described “transition” EP Metanoia back in March and that it’s great to have them back. Since the trio will be hitting the road next month, we asked Mutterperl and drummer Zack Hansen to contribute another chapter in our ongoing series of what gets played in the tour van. After you’ve checked out their picks below, get a copy of Metanoia here. What You Were is also being released on vinyl for the first time next month, and you can pre-order that here.

When I’m on the road and it’s my turn to drive, it’s essential that I have a few things: coffee, light assorted snackery, and tunes that keep me engaged and pass the time. Here are my picks.–Matt Mutterperl

The Smashing Pumpkins–Mellon Collie And The Infinite Sadness (1995)
I first got this album when I was in grade school and I only jammed a few other songs besides the singles. Years later when I revisited it, I listened all the way through it and it was totally captivating. I love this record. We attempted covering “Bodies”, but it’s been on the drawing board for a while, unfortunately. Gets better with every listen through, I think. Perfect to get lost in.

Q And Not U–No Kill No Beep Beep (2000)
I moved to Arizona in the middle of high school, and I had zero friends for a little bit, except for the internet. A forum I was on had mentioned Dischord Records, and somehow I came across Q And Not U. This album was a real eye-opener/taste-shaper/mind-expander. It’s catchy as hell, and usually [bassist/vocalist] Evan Leek and I can sing along to most of it and dance like a couple of hip jerks!

Weezer–Pinkerton (1996, 2010 deluxe edition)
Again, an album that I briefly flirted with as a youth and came back to appreciate later. Pinkerton has that raw, visceral emotion that Weezer’s other offerings don’t really do for me. I can listen straight through, finger-drumming along for almost an hour before we hit the b-sides and live tracks: “Getting Up and Leaving” and “Tragic Girl” are solid tracks that I had never heard before and instantly fell in love with.

Glassjaw–Worship And Tribute (2002)
I’ve listened to this album countless times, and it never gets old to me. From front to finish, Daryl Palumbo’s vocals never let up. Hell, every instrument is shining here. “Tip Your Bartender” quickly sets the tone and all of the sudden I’m on “Pink Roses” and still jamming. I can easily get lost in this piece for it to satisfy part of an overnight drive. This album is timeless to me.

Sleep is such an invaluable resource on the road, you really take for granted just how comfortable the minute sounds of your own room are. Then you have to take into account the guys snoring their skulls off, the hardwood floor, the unfamiliar houses and the non stop ringing in your ears. Most of the time music is a necessity just to get those four hours of sleep you need to get back in the driver’s seat. North plays loud, heavy, and extreme music and so many of my favorite artists and groups are the opposite of that. I think a good contrast is needed. Here are some albums I need to get by on tour.–Zack Hansen

Sigur Rós–Ágætis byrjun (1999)
Such a monumental record, this band can do no wrong in my eyes. When we first started touring, I didn’t drive a lot. I would just throw on this record and ( ), and pass out in the back of the van for hours. I’m not sure I could stay awake through more than two songs, it was just so soothing and melancholic that I had no choice but to shut down completely.

Sylvain Chauveau–Singular Forms (Sometimes Repeated) (2010)
I listen to a lot of composers and I think Frenchman Sylvain Chauveau is one of the strangest. Singular Forms bucked the trend of his previous albums and went so completely minimal that it becomes borderline creepy. The vocals make this project and really set it apart from the rest of his work. It’s rhythmic, raw, repetitive, and disconcerting. Doesn’t sound like the most appealing music when you need rest but it works. This is one of those albums where I’ll fall asleep over and over, only to wake up in the middle, only to go to right back to sleep again.

Mouth Of The Architect–Quietly (2008)
One of the most important records of my adulthood. It came out around the same time as our first full length, What You Were, in the summer of 2008. We were on tour for a month and our route was a few days behind the MOTA, Intronaut and Behold The Arctopus tour. We sometimes even played the same venue. All the while I listened to Quietly twice a day at least. It was my go to record when I needed peace and quiet. At the same time it’s not a gentle record, quite the opposite in fact. It’s so depressing and dark, from the opening sample of the wind chimes to the final vocals on “A Beautiful Corpse”. This is the music I needed to shut down the rest of the world for a time.

Braveyoung–We Are Lonely Animals (2011)
We toured with Braveyoung when they were known as Giant in our early instrumental days and they really showed me how tour was supposed to be done. I look up to them musically and as people. They went from putting out such a ridiculously crushing EP in Song to instrumental perfection on We Are Lonely Animals. I could listen to this all day and night, and sometimes do. It’s a nice reminder of the art and true beauty in music. It’s making me sappy as we speak. Their last record Will The Dust Praise You is equally inspiring.

*Photo by Andrew Weiss

**Pick up a copy of Metanoia here and check out the band on the following dates:

8/01/2014 Club Congress – Tucson, AZ
8/02/2014 TBA – Santa Fe, NM
8/03/2014 Denver Black Sky – Denver, CO
8/04/2014 FOKL Center – Kansas City, MO
8/05/2014 The Triple rock – Minneapolis, MN
8/06/2014 Quarters – Milwaukee, WI (with Northless)
8/07/2014 The Empty Bottle – Chicago, IL (with Northless)
8/08/2014 Ottawa Tavern – Toledo, OH
8/09/2014 The Shop – Pittsburgh, PA
8/10/2014 King Fun Necktie – Philadelphia, PA
8/11/2014 TBA – Brooklyn, NY
8/12/2014 Strange Matter – Richmond, VA
8/13/2014 Slim’s Downtown – Raleigh, NC
8/14/2014 The Poison Lawn – Knoxville, TN
8/15/2014 Wallstreet – Murfreesboro, TN
8/16/2014 The Forge – Birmingham, AL (with Set and Setting)
8/17/2014 Hey Café – New Orleans, LA (with Set and Setting)
8/18/2014 Hi-Tone – Little Rock, AR (with Set and Setting)
8/19/2014 Lindbeerg’s – Springfield, MO (with Set and Setting)
8/20/2014 The Conservatory – Oklahoma City, OK
8/21/2014 Holy Mountain – Austin, TX
8/22/2014 Lowbrow Palace – El Paso, TX
10/16-19/2014 Southwest Terror Fest III, Tucson, AZ

***Past Decibrity entries include:

Tombs
Sadgiqacea
The Atlas Moth
Arch Enemy
Archspire
Cormorant
Eyehategod (Part 1) (Part 2)
Floor
Iron Reagan
Fight Amp
Cynic
Melt-Banana
Junius (Part 1) (Part 2)
Alcest
East Of The Wall
Enabler
Wolvserpent
Drugs Of Faith
SubRosa (Part 1) (Part 2)
Vattnet Viskar
Skeletonwitch
Ihsahn
Earthless
Watain
Orange Goblin
God Is An Astronaut
Primitive Man
Gorguts
Exhumed
Ulcerate
Pelican
Scale The Summit
Mikael Stanne (Dark Tranquillity) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Mouth Of The Architect
Howl
Kings Destroy
Zozobra
Call of the Void
Saint Vitus Bar
Coliseum
Woe
Anciients
Soilwork (Dirk Verbeuren) (Björn Strid)
Intronaut
BATILLUS
Inter Arma
Helen Money
Misery Index
Ancient VVisdom
Holy Grail
Rotten Sound
Ancestors (Part 1) (Part 2)
Kowloon Walled City (Part 1) (Part 2)
Aaron Stainthorpe (My Dying Bride) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Early Graves
All That Remains
Bison B.C.
A Life Once Lost
Fight Amp
Witchcraft (Ola Henriksson) (Magnus Pelander)
Vision of Disorder
Grave
Anders Nyström (Katatonia) (Part 1) (Part 2)
“Best of” Rush (Part 1) (Part 2)
Dawnbringer
Ufomammut
Shadows Fall
Horseback
Greg Mackintosh (Paradise Lost) (Part 1) (Part 2)
Torche
“Best of” Meshuggah
Astra
Pallbearer
Barren Earth
Shane Embury (Napalm Death) (Part 1) (Part 2)